Thinking For A Change

Some of us haven’t made any changes to the way we approach our ministry in a long time.  If you are still doing ministry the way you were the first year you started, then it’s time to think differently.   “Thinking For A Change” takes some intentional focus.  Here are a couple of thoughts to help you become a better thinker…

How to be a better thinker:

1.    Set aside thinking time.

You will never be a good thinker unless you plan to.  You need to set aside time in your schedule that is distraction-free.  Take the time to think through and pray through all the different strategies you are implementing in ministry.  Ask God to give you a fresh perspective about these strategies.  Some may require tweaking.  Others may require overhaul.  One thing is for sure, you will never “fall into” thinking time.  It has to be scheduled and planned.

2.    Spend time with good thinkers.

Are there some great thinkers in your church?  Maybe they are business people, but God has gifted them with great thinking skills.  Are there Kids Ministers in your area that you respect?  Listen to how they process things.  Analyze the way they attack issues and difficulties.  It will stretch your ability to think.

For example – if you are a bad golfer, you don’t choose to play with guys that are as bad as you.  You know you will never learn anything.  Instead, you try to talk a couple of good golfers to let you tag along their foursome.  You try your best to pick up their habits and approaches.  It’s the same with thinking skills.

Find a good thinker:  ask them what they see, watch who they hang around, they don’t always act like they have the answer.  When they don’t know the answer, they go search and find someone who does.  Do the same thing.

3.    When you are with a good thinker, ask “WHY” they do what they do.

The person who wants to be a doer (task oriented) will ask “what do you do?”  The person who wants to be a learner asks “Why do you do what you do?”  It’s all about knowing what you don’t know.

Who are the thinkers that you can learn from?  Call them or email them this week.  Set up a time to meet with them.  Ask God to guide the conversation.  It’s time to THINK for a change!

4 thoughts on “Thinking For A Change

  1. Brian,
    On point #2. Spend time with good thinkers. I may not be able to hang out with you in person but that’s why I subscribe to your blog and I have learned much from you (and others like you), and pass it on to others by posting links to your blogs.

    I especially like the third point you make that “The person who wants to be a doer (task oriented) will ask ‘what do you do?’ The person who wants to be a learner asks ‘Why do you do what you do?’ It’s all about knowing what you don’t know.”
    The comment about a “doer” asking, “what do you do?” brought to mind my Lead Pastor’s mantra that as leaders we cannot merely be “doers of tasks” but we must be “developers of people”. Turning your statement around from addressing the learner, to addressing us as leaders, if we want to see our teams truly grow and change, we must not only give them the “what” and the “how” but also the “why”.

    Along this line, the prayer I most often pray for others and for myself is the one the Apostle Paul prayed for the Colossian church in Colossians 1:9-12. “…To ask that you may be filled with the knowledge of His will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding;…
    Knowledge tells us “what to do”
    Wisdom tells us “when and how to do it”
    Understanding tells us “why we do it” – to comprehend the heart of God.

    … that you may walk worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing Him, being fruitful in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God..”

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