Helping Parents Talk To Their Kids About God

I have recently started a teaching series at our church called “How To Talk To Your Kids About…”  In this series, I am hoping to help parents engage in meaningful conversations with their kids about some very BIG and important subjects.  I thought it might be helpful if I shared some of these teachings with my blog readers.

I have included the basic outline below.  Also, you can listen to audio of the full teaching HERE:

Feel free to use it to teach the parents of the children in your ministry  about the importance of having meaningful GOD conversations with their kids.

“How To Talk To Your Kids About…God”

My Mistake:  Not recognizing the role of parents as the primary spiritual leaders of their children.

“Only be careful, and watch yourselves closely so that you do not forget the things your eyes have seen or let them slip from your heart as long as you live. Teach them to your children and to their children after them. Remember the day you stood before the Lord your God at Horeb, when he said to me, “Assemble the people before me to hear my words so that they may learn to revere me as long as they live in the land and may teach them to their children.”  –  Deuteronomy 4:9-10

“These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Write them on the door frames of your houses and on your gates.” – Deuteronomy 6:6-9

Deuteronomy 11:18-19, Proverbs 22:6, Ephesians 6:4

1.   Recognize that it is not one conversation, but many.

2.  Share what you know.

3.   Learn more so you can share more.

4.  Pray with your kids daily.

5.  Have regular family devotions with your kids.

6.   Worship with your kids.

7.   Serve with your kids.

8.   Model Godly behavior for your kids.

9.  Allow your kids to ask questions.

10.  Don’t be afraid to say, “I don’t know.”

11.  Discover the answer together.

12.  Explain the Gospel in clear, understandable terms.

Related Posts…

“How To Talk To Your Kids About Death & Tragedy”

“How To Talk To Your Kids About SEX”

 

Should I Tell My Lead Pastor About This?

“Should I tell my Lead Pastor About This NOW or LATER?”

It’s a question that most staff members struggle with.  “When is the right time to share information with my Lead Pastor?”  Naturally, you don’t want to be a pest and “bother” him.  At the same time, you don’t want to hold onto information that may be vital to the church for a long time and deprive him of the opportunity to respond in an appropriate way in the appropriate time.

Here is a good list to follow when deciding “Should I tell my Lead Pastor About This NOW or LATER?” that my pastor shared with us.

Report to Lead Pastor NOW (phone call or face to face) if…

1)    Someone in the church is angry or upset (he doesn’t want to be blindsided and not be prepared for it)

2)    If you made a critical mistake (leadership, judgement error, etc.)

3)    If someone is facing a crisis or emergency

4)    If it affects the Sunday Morning (main) service (whether today is Monday or Saturday, doesn’t matter)

5)    If it is a sin issue in the leadership team

6)    If it is a “significant” financial issue (the term “significant” varies with each Lead Pastor)

7)    If a crucial judgement call is required (don’t just guess on what your Lead Pastor would do, ask him)

8)  Hospital/Death/Birth (these are significant life moments your pastor wants to be part of)

9)  If an important event has a major change

10) If YOU have a significant family crisis

11) If he receives a phone call or visit from someone of importance

12) If it’s a liability issue that could negatively affect the church

Save it for later (e-mail, staff meeting, or in-person) if…

1)    No action can be taken right now

2)    He won’t end up hearing it from anyone else

3)    It doesn’t affect the upcoming service or event

4)    You have dealt with it completely with no chance of negative consequences

5)    It is “regular” business (approving someone for ministry, calendar decisions, general updates)

6)    If the information can be shared in a meeting setting (with others present)

7)    If you are merely reporting facts (FYI)

8)    If the decision falls within your discretionary authority

9) When the lack of information won’t hurt them

10) If it’s a personal issue, but non-emergency

11) If you disagree with a leadership decision they have made

What do you think?  Would you add or take away any from these lists?  Share your comments in the comments section.

Three Reasons You Might Be Losing The Boys In Your Kids Ministry

I came across this TED talk the other day, and it very much intrigued me.  For those unfamiliar with TED – it is a gathering place for some of the smartest and insightful people on the planet.  Every day, there are new talks (5-15 minutes in length) that vary in topic from physchology to art to science to quantum physics.  They are found at TED.com.

This particular talk is by Ali Carr-Chellman, an instructional designer and author who studies the most effective ways to teach kids and to make changes at school.  In this talk she pinpoints three reasons boys are tuning out of school in droves, and lays out her bold plan to re-engage them: bringing their culture into the classroom, with new rules that let boys be boys, and video games that teach as well as entertain.

I think there are many implications for those of us in Kids Ministry.  Are we doing what we need to be doing in order to make our Kids Ministry palatable for boys to be engaged and “belong?”  I challenge you to give 12 minutes to watch this talk.  Then, leave a comment in my comments section to let me know your thoughts on this subject.

It’s Not WHAT You Say, It’s HOW You Say It

Words are powerful tools in the hands of a Kidmin Leader.  You can use them either intentionally or haphazardly.  It is important to remember when typing an email, crafting a letter to parents, or putting together a promotional piece for your next big event – words matter.

Zig Ziglar, a legendary motivational speaker, gave an unforgettable example of the power of emphasis.  By changing the emphasis in the following sentence, it can take on several entirely different meanings and implications:  “I didn’t say he beat his wife.”

I didn’t say he beat his wife.

I didn’t say he beat his wife.

I didn’t say he beat his wife.

I didn’t say he beat his wife.

I didn’t say he beat his wife.

I didn’t say he beat his wife.

Pay attention to how you emphasize the words you use.  Remember, the right word with the right emphasis at the right time has great power.

“A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in a setting of silver.” – Proverbs 25:11

You have the power to build up or destroy with one word or phrase.  Choose your words carefully, today.